Leonardo da Vinci — A Mind in Motion

Address:
British Library, 96 Euston Road, St. Pancras, London
Tel:
0330 333 1144

Dates and ticket price

Dates & Time:
7th June to 8th September 2019
9.30 AM to 6 PM (Mon, Wed-Fri); 9.30 AM to 8 PM (Tue); 9.30 AM to 5 PM (Sat); 11 AM to 5 PM (Sun)
Tickets & Cost:
£7, from bl.uk

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The British Library will be marking the 500th anniversary of Leonardo da Vinci's death by bringing together pages from three of his extraordinary notebooks: the Codex Arundel, Codex Forster and Codex Leicester.

The Codex Leicester is widely considered to be one of Leonardo's most important scientific notebooks, and this will be the first time it has been displayed in the UK since it was purchased by Bill Gates.

The exhibition will focus on his fascination with motion, and include many intricate drawings and diagrams, and examples of his famous mirror writing. Amongst the detailed studies are his thoughts on natural phenomena like water, and insights into subjects as varied as the waves, wind, and the nature of light and shadow. You'll also see some of his designs for an underwater breathing apparatus, and a perpetual motion wheel that was thought capable of producing energy.

 

Talk about this event

Craig’s review of British Library – “The British Library is a construction of such monumental ugliness that it's worth seeing simply for that. Come and see the ugliest building in London! It's as if they've tipped a billion bricks into a pile and now they're waiting for the builders to start putting it all together. Only they won't. Because it's finished. This is it. Now it just sits on the side of the E… continued”

Read Craig’s review of British Library

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If you enjoy British Library then you might like to visit Charles Dickens Museum (walk it in 14 mins or catch the tube from Kings Cross St Pancras to Russell Square), Dr. Johnson’s House (walk it in 28 mins or catch the tube from Kings Cross St Pancras to Temple), Globe Theatre (catch the train from Kings Cross St Pancras to Southwark), Keats’ House (catch the train from Kings Cross St Pancras to Hampstead) and Sherlock Holmes Museum (walk it in 30 mins or catch the tube from Kings Cross St Pancras to Baker Street)

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