Buddhism exhibition, at the British Library

Address:
British Library, 96 Euston Road, St. Pancras, London
Tel:
0330 333 1144

Dates and ticket price

Dates & Time:
25th October 2019 to 25th February 2020
9.30 AM to 6 PM (Mon, Wed-Fri); 9.30 AM to 8 PM (Tue); 9.30 AM to 5 PM (Sat); 11 AM to 5 PM (Sun)
Tickets & Cost:
£14, from bl.uk

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Euston OVR NRN VIC, King’s Cross St. Pancras CRC H&C MET NRN PCL VIC
The closest station to British Library is Kings Cross St Pancras
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The British Library's new exhibition will explore the origins and philosophy of Buddhism, from its early beginnings in India to having more than 1 billion followers today.

The exhibition will include many rare and beautiful treasures from colourful scrolls and cosmologies, to lavishly painted manuscripts, temple banners and bejewelled books. The objects will span 2,000 years and come from 20 countries, making it the largest display of its kind ever held at the British Library.

You will be able to read sacred scriptures on tree bark, follow the life of Buddha on exquisite silk scrolls, and learn why Buddhism was pivotal in developing many of the writing and printing techniques that carried stories and ideas across Asia.

You will also learn a little about current customs through contemporary art, film and audio, and gain an insight into modern meditative practices and the Buddhist concepts of compassion and loving-kindness.

 

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