Tate Britain

Tate Britain
Tate Britain map
Address:
Tate Britain, Millbank, Westminster SW1P 4RG
Tel:
0207 887 8888
Web:
tate.org.uk

Opening times and price

Opening hours:
10 AM to 6 PM (Mon-Sun); Last entry 1 hour before closing
Visiting hours are subject to change
Ticket cost:
Adults free entry
Time required:
A typical visit to Tate Britain lasts 1½-2 hours (approx)

Getting to Tate Britain

Driving:
Service stations and parking near Tate Britain
Taxis:
Minicab firms close to Tate Britain
Buses:
2, 36, 87, 88, 436, C10 – London bus fares
Trains:
Pimlico VIC, Vauxhall VIC
The nearest train station to Tate Britain is Pimlico
Plan your journey from Earl’s Court, Euston, King’s Cross, Liverpool Street, London Bridge, Marylebone, Paddington, Victoria, Waterloo or another London Underground station:
Train journey to Tate Britain
London train fares · Oyster fares · Travelcard fares · Contactless fares
Hotels:
Accommodation near Tate Britain
Inside the Tate Britain gallery Tate Britain Gallery

Craig’s London blog> Read Craig’s review of Tate Britain  Check out my London blog for a full review, with more photos

Good for kids? Value for money? free Worth a visit?

Tate Britain is No.2 in our list of London’s best galleries, and No.7 in our list of great things to do for free.

The Tate started life in 1897, when Sir Henry Tate gifted his entire collection of sixty-five paintings to the nation.

Extensions were added at regular intervals throughout the century, but by the year 2000 the Tate’s art collection had grown so large that the vast majority of it was never on show to the public.

The decision was then taken to divide the collection up, and the gallery was renamed Tate Britain – focusing solely on British art from the 16th-century onwards.

Most of the remaining paintings were transferred to the Tate Modern, an old converted power station on the Thames. There is now a third branch of the Tate in Liverpool’s Albert Docks.

Paintings at the Tate

Some of the famous artists on display at the Tate include David Hockney, Francis Bacon, William Blake, William Hogarth, Thomas Gainsborough and John Constable.

The great J W Turner has his own devoted wing – the Clore Gallery.

Some of the famous paintings include the haunting Ophelia by John Millais, and John William Waterhouse’s The Lady of Shalott. You can also see some sculptures by Henry Moore.

Contemporary artists from modern times include the wild-child Tracey Emin, and sculptor Antony Gormley (responsible for the famous Angel of the North).

The Turner Prize exhibition

From early October to December every year, Tate Britain houses the Turner Prize exhibition. Most of the winners are either shockingly bad, or stunningly good – depending on your point of view.

 
  • AliBell – “Its not the first gallery I would recommend (the national is much better), but if you've done the others then you shouldnt definitely try and visit this one. Dont be put off by its somewhat out of the way location. There are some grat paintings in here by the likes of turner, constable and gainsborough. They are all british artists here -- that is why its called tate britain -- so obviously there isnt the range of artists that you will find at the national, but if you like landscapes then you will be more than Satisfied. There are some of the greatest landscape painters of all-time here. If you go then plan some time to take the boat between tate britain and tate modern. That is a lovely boatride that goes past lots of famous places, and is almost worth doing on its own.”
  •  Guest – “Tate britain gallery used to be great. In the last two years it has gone off - big time. No room numbers, no floor plan (on line or as a paper folder). A major inability to display all their big crowd pleaser. Avoid and go to the national gallery or tate modern or wallace collection. Visit only for the big paying exhibitions!!!.”

> Talk about this attraction

> Craig’s review of Tate Britain – “Tate Britain is the one gallery that I've never bothered to visit before today. And the reason is this: I'm lazy. Yeah I know it's a dumb excuse, but it's true. They need to knock it down and move it closer to the train station. You've either got to get off at Vauxhall and walk across the bridge (not doing that), or get a tube to Pimlico (not doing that either), or wa… continued”

Events at Tate Britain

The photographs of Don McCullin to

Van Gogh and Britain to

Frank Bowling at Tate Britain to

William Blake — The Artist to

Turner Prize winner, Mark Leckey to

If you enjoy this then try: Courtauld Gallery (walk it in 30 mins or catch a train from Pimlico to Courtauld Gallery); National Gallery (walk it in 26 mins or catch a train from Pimlico to National Gallery); National Portrait Gallery (walk it in 26 mins or catch a train from Pimlico to National Portrait Gallery); Royal Academy of Arts (walk it in 28 mins or catch a train from Pimlico to Royal Academy of Arts) and Wallace Collection (catch the tube from Pimlico to Wallace Collection).

Top 10 Best art galleries in London Here’s our pick of the best galleries in London from classical art at the National and Courtauld to modern contemporary art at the Tate.
Franz West at the Tate Modern This retrospective will showcase some large-scale works and sculptures by Franz West - one of the leading figures in European art
Van Gogh and Britain The 40 paintings in this important exhibition will represent the largest collection of paintings by Vincent Van Gogh in the UK for 10 years.
Drop-in Drawing at the National Portrait Gallery Enjoy a free drop-in drawing session at the National Portrait Gallery, amongst some of the gallery's great works of art.
Review National Portrait Gallery If you're coming to London for a week then you have to find time for at least one art gallery. You can't just do fun stuff for seven days, that's not allowed. Art gallery first, then fun. Do…
Review Royal Academy of Arts You might find this hard to believe if you've read a few of my galley reviews, but I did actually go to art school once. And I really do mean once (I quit on the very first day). After looki…
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