Saatchi Gallery

Saatchi Gallery map
Address:
Saatchi Gallery, Duke of York’s HQ, King’s Road, Chelsea SW3 4SQ
Web:
saatchigallery.com

Opening times and price

Opening hours:
10 AM to 6 PM (Mon-Sun); Last entry 30 mins before closing
Visiting hours are subject to change
Ticket cost:
Adults free entry
Time required:
A typical visit to Saatchi Gallery lasts 1 hour (approx)

Getting to Saatchi Gallery

Parking:
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Taxis:
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Buses:
11, 19, 22, 49, 137, 211, 319
Bus fares 2019
Trains:
Sloane Square CRC DSC
The closest train station to Saatchi Gallery is Sloane Square
Train fares 2019
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Front entrance of the Saatchi Gallery in Chelsea Saatchi Gallery, Chelsea

Craig’s London blog> Read Craig’s review of the Saatchi Gallery  Check out my London blog for a full review, with more photos>

Good for kids? Value for money? free Worth a visit?

The Saatchi Gallery was opened in April 2003 and is made up of work culled from Charles Saatchi’s own private collection.

It was originally situated in the old GLC building – part of the County Hall complex overlooking the Thames, but has since moved to a site in Chelsea.

Charles Saatchi’s art collection

Saatchi’s original idea was to promote artists who rarely got the opportunity to exhibit their work. Famous names like Damien Hirst and Tracey Emin have all been on show here, but a disastrous fire in 2003 put paid to a large part of his collection.

 
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  • ChrisP – “This gallery is like the emperor's new clothes story.. The one where the emperor things he's wearing the most beautiful clothes and because he's so famous everyone else does too, until a lowly idiot in the crowd pipes up that he's actually naked, and then everyone suddenly realises that what he's wearing is nothing at all. Well, if people went into the saatchi with their eyes open and dont get taken in by all the hype then they should see through this 'art' for what it really is -- pretentious twaddle. It is rubbish!. I went to the sculpture exhibition and there were things there that wouldn't look out of place in a dump. My description of it (which is 100% accurate) is that it was junk, covered in dust. I hate to think how much saatchi paid for it. Another 'sculpture' was nothing more than a load of rocks on a little pedastal, one pedastal for each rock. The rocks hadnt been worked in any way, they weren't 'sculpted'. It looked like they had just been pl”

Ask a question about this attraction

If you enjoy this then try: Hayward Gallery (catch the tube from Sloane Square to Waterloo); Serpentine Gallery (walk it in 24 mins or catch a train from Sloane Square to South Kensington) and Tate Modern (catch the tube from Sloane Square to Southwark).

Diane Arbus: In The Beginning In The Beginning collects together more than 100 works by the American photographer Diane Arbus from her early career
Elizabethan Miniatures by Hilliard and Oliver The Elizabethan Treasures exhibition brings together many of the best miniature paintings from the 16th and 17th-century
Burne-Jones exhibition at Tate Britain Tate Britain will be putting on a retrospective of work by the last of the Pre-Raphaelites, Sir Edward Coley Burne-Jones.
Alfred Munnings: Horse artist from World War I World War I paintings by Sir Alfred Munnings created when he was part of the Canadian Expeditionary Force
Phyllida Barlow at the Royal Academy The RA will be showing one of Phyllida Barlow's large-scale installations in the new Gabrielle Jungels-Winkler Gallery
Van Gogh and Britain The 40 paintings in this important exhibition will represent the largest collection of paintings by Vincent Van Gogh in the UK for 10 years.
Craig’s review of Queen's Gallery The Queen certainly does have a lot of nice knick-knacks. She's got so many of them, in fact, that she's she's had to open up a whole extra art gallery next-door to Buckingham Palace. The first thing you need to know about the Queen's Gallery is that it has an annoying habit of selling you a timed ticket during busy periods. So if you're one of those meticulous people who plans out… continued
Craig’s review of Hayward Gallery They call this style of architecture 'Brutalist' which is as perfect a description as you can possibly get. It's just angled stacks of concrete -- the same stuff they make those thundering ring roads out of, or those tower block flats where the stairwells stink of p*ss. It looks like a bunker built to withstand a nuclear bomb blast. If World War III ever breaks out then the Hayward… continued
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