Queen’s House, National Maritime Museum

Queen’s House
Queen’s House map location

Queen’s House address and telephone

Address:
Queen’s House is located at: Romney Road, Greenwich,
London SE10 9NF
England
Telephone:
You can contact Queen’s House on Work +44 (0) 208 858 4422
Website:
The Queen’s House website can be visited at www.rmg.co.uk

Queen’s House opening times and ticket price

Opening hours:
Queen’s House is open to the public from: 10 AM to 5 PM (Mon-Sun)
Visiting hours are subject to change, and may not apply on public holidays. Always reconfirm whether it’s open to visitors before making plans to visit Queen’s House
Time required:
A typical visit to Queen’s House lasts 30-45 mins (approx)
Ticket cost:
The entry price for Queen’s House is: Adults free entry

How to get to Queen’s House

When visiting Queen’s House you can use the following:
Minicabs:
Find minicab and taxi firms near Queen’s House
Buses:
129, 177, 180, 188, 199, 386
London bus fares
Trains:
Cutty Sark DLR
If you want to visit Queen’s House by train then the nearest underground station to Queen’s House is Cutty Sark
London underground fares
Queen’s House Easy to get to? Good for kids? Value for money? free Worth a visit? 103

History of Queen’s House

Queen’s House was commissioned by James I in 1616 as a summer residence for his wife, the Anne of Denmark.

It was built by the famous architect Inigo Jones in the new Palladian style, and caused an utter sensation as nothing had been seen like this in England before.

Queen’s House in Greenwich

Along with Banqueting House it is one of the few buildings by Jones to survive to modern times, and can rightly be labelled his piece de resistance. “Solid, proportionable to the rules, masculine and unaffected.”

Unfortunately Anne of Denmark died before it was completed, so Charles I carried on the work for his queen: Henrietta Maria.

Queen’s House in London

National Maritime Museum

Queen’s House later became a home for aristocrats, and then a school, before the government finally turned it over to the National Maritime Museum for use as a gallery. It now houses a collection of naval paintings.

Craig’s review of Queen’s House

This review originally appeared in his London blog

Nowadays Queen’s House is nothing more than an adjunct for the National Maritime Museum, but guidebook describes it as one of the most important buildings in the country.

When it was originally built by Inigo Jones it was genuinely revolutionary, but is it any good these days? Answer: er… it’s okay, I suppose.

I accept that it must have been amazing back in the day, but when you look at it now it’s just a big white shoebox. I visited Banqueting House the other day and when you step inside your eyes open wide to take it all in. There’s nothing like that here. There’s no big painting on the ceiling.

Inside Inigo Jones’s Queen’s House

The main hall is just two stories tall with a checkerboard floor, and a balcony running round the inside. Think ‘posh hotel foyer’, and that you will have some idea of what it looks like.

There are lots of pokey little rooms off to the side containing paintings from the National Maritime Museum. They all show big boats, boats in battle, and portraits of famous sailors. Some of them are by famous painters like Gainsborough and Reynolds.

If you like boats then you’ll probably get a kick out of it, but for the rest of us it’s the kind of place that you’ll only visit… once.

National Maritime Museum in Greenwich

Craig’s London blog> Read Craig’s latest review of Queen’s House  “Queen’s House is one of those buildings that gets eulogised in all the guidebooks, but when you actually come and see it you’ll think… huh, okay. Is that it?. If you weren’t told it was famous beforehand then you wouldn’t have a clue it was. Can you see the Old Royal Naval College on the other side of the road? That’s where the Tudor Palace used to be. Whenever you read about Henry VIII and Elizabeth I staying at Greenwich Palace then that’s where it was. James I added Queen’s… continued.”

Craig’s London blog> Read Craig’s review of the National Maritime Museum  “I do like the National Maritime Museum, but given Britain’s rich history of war on the waves, and the fact that we won just about every battle we ever fought, it always seems a bit sparse on content to me. Where’s the rest of it? I suppose we must have sunk it all. All you’ll find downstairs are some ship’s figureheads, a titchy model of Nelson’s Column, a gilded barge from Georgian times, two old industrial engines, a few scale models and a silver speedboat. That is practically it. That is downstairs done unless you like looking at old paintings of the River Thames. Luckily I do… continued.”

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The other attractions worth visiting in Greenwich are the Old Royal Naval College, National Maritime Museum and Royal Observatory on top of Greenwich Hill. You might like to explore the Cutty Sark ship as well. Or how about catching a sightseeing boat from Westminster to Greenwich? The best boat companies are City Cruises and Thames River Services.


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  • Craig – “I’m sure that it must have been amazing back in the day, but when you look at it these days it's just a big white shoebox. I went to banqueting house the other day and when you stepped inside your eyes opened wide to take it all in. There's nothing like that here. No big painting on the ceiling. The main hall is just two stories tall with a checkerboard floor, and a balcony running round the inside. Think "posh hotel foyer", and you will have some idea what it looks like. There's lots of rooms off to the side containing paintings from the national maritime museum. They all show big boats, boats in battle, and portraits of famous sailors. Some of them are by famous painters, like gainsborough and reynolds. There's also a few rooms on the history of the house. If you like boats then you'll probably get a kick out of it, but for the rest of us it's the kind of place that you'll only visit.. Once.”

Whilst you’re visiting Queen’s House you can go and see some of these other Greenwich attractions

> Banqueting House Banqueting House, the execution site of Charles I, is the only surviving part of Whitehall Palace.
> National Maritime Museum The National Maritime Museum contains the actual jacket that Admiral Nelson wore at Trafalgar.
> Old Royal Naval College The Old Royal Naval College was designed by Christopher Wren as a home for injured sailors.
 

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