National Portrait Gallery

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National Portrait Gallery map location

National Portrait Gallery address and telephone

Address:
National Portrait Gallery is located at: St. Martin’s Place (just off Trafalgar Square),
London WC2H 0HE
England
Telephone:
You can contact National Portrait Gallery on Work +44 (0) 207 306 0055
Website:
The National Portrait Gallery website can be visited at npg.org.uk

National Portrait Gallery opening times and ticket price

Opening hours:
National Portrait Gallery is open to the public from: 10 AM to 6 PM (Sat-Wed); 10 AM to 9 PM (Thu-Fri); Last entry 15 mins before closing
Visiting hours are subject to change, and may not apply on public holidays. Always reconfirm whether it’s open to visitors before making plans to visit National Portrait Gallery
Time required:
A typical visit to National Portrait Gallery lasts 1½-2 hours (approx)
Ticket cost:
The entry price for National Portrait Gallery is: Adults free entry

How to get to National Portrait Gallery

When visiting National Portrait Gallery you can use the following:
Minicabs:
Find minicab and taxi firms near National Portrait Gallery
Buses:
3, 6, 9, 11, 12, 13, 15, 23, 24, 29, 87, 88, 91, 139, 159, 176, 453
London bus fares
Trains:
Charing Cross BKL NRN, Covent Garden PCL, Embankment BKL CRC DSC NRN, Leicester Square NRN PCL, Piccadilly Circus BKL PCL
If you want to visit National Portrait Gallery by train then the nearest underground station to National Portrait Gallery is Charing Cross
London underground fares

Craig’s London blog> Read Craig’s review of the National Portrait Gallery  Check out my London blog for a full review

National Portrait Gallery Easy to get to? Good for kids? Value for money? free Worth a visit? 203

 From National Portrait GalleryLondon

 National Portrait GalleryLondon

See all events at National Portrait Gallery

 

The National Portrait Gallery opened in 1856 and moved to its present site near the National Gallery forty years later. All of the images are of Britons past and present – a history of England in pictures.

It is a rather peculiar gallery, in that the works are judged more by historical importance than artistic merit. The works are all about the status of the sitter, rather than the person painting the image. So its chief role is putting a face to the names that you read about in your history books.

The Tudor and Stuart Galleries

The galleries are arranged in chronological order, starting with a masterpiece. A huge portrait of Queen Elizabeth I strides across a map of Britain – storm clouds raging where the Spanish Armada sank into the sea.

A surfeit of monarchs follows, with studies of Henry VII, Henry VIII and James I.

The Henry VII piece is the oldest in the gallery – painted by an unknown artist in 1505.

The most important piece is probably the one of Henry VIII – painted by Hans Holbein in 1536.

Another intriguing piece is the Duke of Monmouth’s portrait. He was the illegitimate son of Charles II who rose up against his uncle – James II. When he was subsequently beheaded he was found to lack a picture, so an artist was quickly summoned while his head was still ‘fresh’, and knocked one out in 24-hours.

Authors at the National Portrait Gallery

If you’re after famous authors, then check out the Brontë Sisters. It was painted by their brother Branwell in 1834. After years of trying to make the grade in print, he died of drink, drugs and depression – you can even see where he painted himself out of the portrait.

There is also a controversial portrait of William Shakespeare – the Chandos portrait. This was the first piece to enter the collection – donated by Lord Ellesmere in 1856. Some people suggest that it isn’t him at all.

Other works include the only known likeness of Jane Austin (by her sister, Cassandra), and Samuel Pepys, William Wordsworth and George Bernard Shaw.

The photographic collection includes views of Oscar Wilde, Virginia Woolf and Lord Tennyson.

 
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  • ian meyer – “I entered the summer exhibition at the royal academy once, and felt the same thing. When I went to pick up my painting I saw everything else I realised how "normal" my painting was. They are looking for things that stand out when they hang them on the wall. If your painting is technically good, but otherwise pretty normal, then forget it. They will not give it a second look. What you need to paint is something that is different to everything else. The technique isn't the most important thing. You need to have an obvious style that is unique to you. I like to think of it as being the same as the x-factor. If all you are is a Decent singer, then you've got no chance. But if you chuck in a weird haircut and a geeky attitude that makes you stand out, then your odds go up remarkably.”
  • pamHMRC – “I think I much prefer the national portrait gallery to the tate gallery. Probably because the meanings behind the paintings are easier to ascertain. My history isn't that great, but I can recognise some kings and queens and famous celebrities. But I am hard pressed to recognise what any painting in the tate gallry is supposed to be about, all I can do is admire their beauty. So the p[ictures in the portrait gallery have an extra little something that draws you in.”

> Events at National Portrait Gallery

  From National Portrait GalleryLondonEnjoy a free drop-in drawing session at the National Portrait Gallery, amongst some of the gallery's great works of art.

   to National Portrait GalleryLondonThe National Portrait Gallery's BP Portrait Award is the most prestigious portrait painting competition in the world.

   to National Portrait GalleryLondon'The Encounter' is a major new portrait exhibition featuring works by Leonardo da Vinci, Holbein, Rubens and Rembrandt.

   to National Portrait GalleryLondonThe National Portrait Gallery will be collecting together more than fifty of Cezanne's portraits in a major new exhibition.

If you like National Portrait Gallery, then you might also like…

> Tate Britain Tate Britain shows British art from the 16th-century onwards. See J W Turner and David Hockney.
> Courtauld Gallery The Courtauld has one of Europe’s finest collections of impressionist and post-impressionist paintings.
> National Gallery The National Gallery has works by Cézanne, Rembrandt, Renoir, Titian, Turner and Van Gogh.
> Wallace Collection The Wallace Collection is one of London’s best galleries, with works by Rembrandt, Rubens and Titian.
 

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