Mansion House

Mansion House
Mansion House map
Address:
Mansion House, The City EC4N 8BH
Web:
cityoflondonguides.com

Getting to Mansion House

Driving:
Service stations and parking near Mansion House
Taxis:
Minicab firms close to Mansion House
Buses:
8, 11, 21, 23, 25, 26, 43, 47, 48, 76, 133, 141, 149, 242 – London bus prices
Trains:
Bank CNT DLR NRN W&C, Cannon Street CRC DSC, Mansion House CRC DSC, Monument CRC DSC, Moorgate CRC H&C MET NRN, St. Paul’s CNT
The nearest train station to Mansion House is Bank
Plan your journey from Earl’s Court, Euston, King’s Cross, Liverpool Street, London Bridge, Marylebone, Paddington, Victoria, Waterloo or another London Underground station:
Train journey to Mansion House
London train tickets · Oyster cards · Travelcard tickets · Contactless cards
Hotels:
Accommodation near Mansion House

Craig’s London blog> Read Craig’s review of the Mansion House tour  Check out my London blog for a full review

Good for kids? Value for money? Worth a visit?

Mansion House is in the heart of The City, near the Bank of England and Royal Exchange. It was built between 1739 and 1753 by George Dance the Elder, and is the official home of the Lord Mayor of London.

Mansion House is built of Portland Stone and has a half-dozen Corinthian columns on the front. On top of these columns is a pediment detailing scenes from London and the history of the Thames.

The banqueting room, known as the ‘Egyptian Hall’, was based on the blueprint of an Egyptian pharaoh’s house, published by Marcus Pollio in the first century BC.

Lord Mayor of London

The first Lord Mayor of London was chosen by King William II in 1189, and his name was Henry Fitzailwyn. It wasn’t until 1215 that the City got to elect their own.

The voters were selected from the various livery guilds that represented the main trades in town. The twelve original guilds were as follows: Mercers, Grocers, Drapers, Fishmongers, Goldsmiths, Skinners, Merchant Tailors, Haberdashers, Salters, Ironmongers, Vintners and Clothworkers. Many more have been added down the years – the latest one being ‘Information Technicians’ in 1992.

This very same vote still takes place today, on the 29th September every year (Michaelmas Day). The winner gets an entry to the Privy Council, and theoretical access to the King or Queen. (This aspect of the role, however, has been much diluted down the years, and the Mayor has no political power.)

Two days after his swearing in the Lord Mayor holds a grand banquet at Guildhall, attended by political figures in Westminster. It has become customary in recent years for the Prime Minister to deliver a speech at this event outlining Britain’s place in world affairs.

[N.B.: It should be noted that the Lord Mayor is not the same post as the Mayor of London. The Lord Mayor just deals with the Square Mile, but the other one watches over the entire expanse of Greater London.]

 
  • TomK – “This is the best corner of London, the best traffic junction in teh country. On one corner youve got the bank of england, and the royal exchange, and then youve got this place as well -- mansion house -- with its huge columns out the front. I walk past it most days going to work in the city but I’ve only recently been inside when my cousin dragged me along on one of its tours. You get to see a lot of paintings (which bored me, to be honest) and a few old swords and stuff, but its the rooms that really impressed me. They are just as impressive as the outside. Its where they do all the public stuff and have dinners for all the bankers that you sometimes see on the news. It's probably not worth a visit on its own, but if you're in the area and you've got an hour to kill, then maybe its worth a look.”

> Talk about this attraction

> Craig’s review of Mansion House – “I went on a tour of Mansion House today. That's the place where the Lord Mayor of London lives. You have to queue up round the side until a nice lady comes and lets you in at 2 PM. Our tour group consisted of about 25 old people and me. And some of them were even older than old, older than the building itself. Maybe that was why the security was so lax. The security… continued”

Events at Mansion House

Mansion House: The Lord Mayor's Residence From

If you enjoy this then try: Banqueting House (catch the tube from Bank to Banqueting House); The City (you can walk there in less than 1 min); Guildhall (you can walk it in 6 mins); Royal Courts of Justice (walk it in 22 mins or catch a train from Bank to Royal Courts of Justice) and Royal Exchange (you can walk it in less than 3 mins).

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Review Mansion House I went on a tour of Mansion House today. That's the place where the Lord Mayor of London lives. You have to queue up round the side until a nice lady comes and lets you in at 2 PM. Our tour…
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