Courtauld Gallery

Courtauld Gallery
Courtauld Gallery map
Address:
Courtauld Gallery, Somerset House, The Strand WC2R 0RN
Tel:
0203 947 7777
Web:
courtauld.ac.uk

Opening times and price

Opening hours:
Closed for renovations. The gallery is not expected to re-open until late 2020
Ticket cost:
Adults £8.00; Children free entry (under-19)
Visiting hours and entry charges are subject to change
Time required:
A typical visit to Courtauld Gallery lasts 1-1½ hours (approx)

Getting to Courtauld Gallery

Driving:
Service stations and parking near Courtauld Gallery
Taxis:
Minicab firms close to Courtauld Gallery
Buses:
6, 9, 11, 13, 15, 23, 77A, 91, 176 – London bus fares
Trains:
Covent Garden PCL, Embankment BKL CRC DSC NRN, Temple CRC DSC
The nearest train station to Courtauld Gallery is Temple
Plan your journey from Earl’s Court, Euston, King’s Cross, Liverpool Street, London Bridge, Marylebone, Paddington, Victoria, Waterloo or another London Underground station:
Train journey to Courtauld Gallery
London train fares · Oyster fares · Travelcard fares · Contactless fares
Hotels:
Accommodation near Courtauld Gallery

Craig’s London blog> Read Craig’s review of the Courtauld Gallery  Check out my London blog for a full review, with more photos

Good for kids? Value for money? Worth a visit?

The Courtauld Gallery is No.3 in our list of London’s best galleries.

Important note: The Courtauld Gallery is currently closed for renovations. It is not expected to re-open again until late 2020.

The Courtauld Institute of Art was founded by Samuel Courtauld in 1931, as an adjunct to the University of London.

The idea was to provide the university with a collection equivalent to the famous museums of Oxford and Cambridge – the Ashmolean and Fitzwilliam.

Courtauld started the ball rolling by bequeathing his entire art collection to it upon his death, as did several other notaries – Robert Witt, William Spooner and Viscount Lee of Fareham.

Impressionist, and post-impressionist art

The Courtauld soon gained a notable reputation, and now houses one of Europe’s finest collections of impressionist and post-impressionist paintings with works by Cézanne, Seurat, Gauguin and Monet.

The stand-out pieces are Van Gogh’s Self-Portrait with a Bandaged Ear, Monet’s Autumn at Argenteuil, Manet’s Bar at the Folies-Bergère and Botticelli’s Trinity with John the Baptist and Mary Magdalene.

The gallery’s premises were augmented in 1991 when it moved from Portman Square to the refined surroundings of Somerset House.

 
  • JRubin – “I've been to all the big galleries like the tate and national but I’ve never really thought about going to the other ones around London. How wrong was i! The courtauld is quite small but the quality of stuff, especially the impressionist is on a par with the best galleries in London. I would go so far to say that their collection of impressionists is even better than the national's.”
  • JP1964 – “Londoners are spoilt when it comes to art galleries. When the superb national gallery, tate britain and tate modern are free, you might wonder why you need to bother with this one, as the fee is quite steep for the size of the gallery. But if you love art, then you should definitely make the effort to go after you have seen the other ones I listed. For starters, somerset house is a beauty -- one of London's hidden treasures, and well worth a visit on its own -- and the works on display are largely on a par with the ones in the national. And the galleries are not as crowded with tourists, probably put off by the entrance fee, allowing you to gaze on the pictures in peace.”

> Talk about this attraction

> Craig’s review of Courtauld Gallery – “When people sit at home planning their itinerary they usually pencil in an hour or two for a gallery (they have to squeeze in a bit of culture), but it's usually the National or Tate Modern. That's enough art for most people. They don't want to overdose on it. But if you're seriously into paintings then here's a tip from me: the best ones to visit are the National Gal… continued”

If you enjoy this then try: National Gallery (walk it in 12 mins or catch a train from Temple to National Gallery); Royal Academy of Arts (walk it in 20 mins or catch a train from Temple to Royal Academy of Arts); Somerset House (you can walk there in less than 1 min); Tate Britain (walk it in 30 mins or catch a train from Temple to Tate Britain) and Wallace Collection (catch the tube from Temple to Wallace Collection).

Top 10 Best art galleries in London Here’s our pick of the best galleries in London from classical art at the National and Courtauld to modern contemporary art at the Tate.
The Renaissance Nude Explore the evolution of nude painting in the 15th and 16th-century through Renaissance painters like Titian, Raphael, Michelangelo and Leonardo
Rembrandt: Thinking On Paper An exhibition of 65 rarely seen Rembrandt prints and drawings to mark the 350th anniversary of the Dutch Master's death
Elizabethan Miniatures by Hilliard and Oliver The Elizabethan Treasures exhibition brings together many of the best miniature paintings from the 16th and 17th-century
Review National Portrait Gallery If you're coming to London for a week then you have to find time for at least one art gallery. You can't just do fun stuff for seven days, that's not allowed. Art gallery first, then fun. Do…
Review Courtauld Gallery When people sit at home planning their itinerary they usually pencil in an hour or two for a gallery (they have to squeeze in a bit of culture), but it's usually the National or Tate Modern…
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