Walk around the Charles Dickens Museum… after dark

Address:
, 48 Doughty Street, London 51.523599 -0.116263
Dates & Time:
Timed tickets from 6.30 PM
Tickets & Cost:
£15
See dickensmuseum.com
Tel:
0207 405 2127
Parking:
Car parks near Charles Dickens Museum
Taxis:
Cab firms close to Charles Dickens Museum
Buses:
7, 17, 19, 38, 45, 46, 55, 243
Bus fares in London
Trains:
Chancery Lane CNT, Russell Square PCL
The closest station to Charles Dickens Museum is Russell Square
Train fares in London
Disclaimer: Event details can change at short notice and you should reconfirm everything before making plans

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Travel back to Victorian times and experience Charles Dickens' beautifully restored home after dark: in dim light, with just a few lamps and candles.

Dickens often wrote by candlelight and was fascinated by the effects created by flames, calling it "a ruddy, homely, brilliant glow".

You will be able to walk around the beautifully furnished interiors, see the desk where he penned many of his best works, and listen to some stories about the dearly departed (it is Halloween, after all!) — they'll even have some clairvoyants to help you uncover the mysteries of the future.

 

 Guest – “What time does this start please?”

Admin – “You have to buy a ticket for a specific time. The first ones are at 6:30 PM”

Got a question? – Talk about this event

 
 

Craig’s review – “Charles Dickens seems to have moved house every five minutes, but the Charles Dickens Museum is the only London one left. It's from a time when he was still making a name for himself. He worked on The Pickwick Papers, Oliver Twist and Nicholas Nickleby here, but was still years away from creating A Christmas Carol, David Copperfield and Great Expectations. He would ha… continued”

Read Craig’s Charles Dickens Museum review

More Halloween events · More museum exhibitions · More literary events · More events at Charles Dickens Museum

 

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